The 25th of May

The 25th of May

The History of Bolivia

On May 25th, 1809, students and nationalists in Sucre declared independence from the Spanish Empire. Known as the “Grito de la Libertad”, or Shout of Liberty, this was the first of many popular uprisings all across South America. Today, Sucre is rightfully proud to be the birthplace of South American independence.

Soldier Bolivia

The 25th of May has become as important a date to Chuquisaqueños as the 4th of July is to US Americans, and for days the city center is taken over by parades. Schoolchildren, labor unions, women’s groups, and a ear-numbing collection of marching bands provide an unceasing spectacle. We showed up to the main square at 10am, to get a glimpse of the President, Evo Morales, who was in town to help Sucre in its celebrations. I even had a chance to assist in a burnt offering to pachamama (Mother Earth) by pouring a little chicha on the ground.

Though it’s not one of Bolivia’s famous traditional, indigenous festivals with dancing and brightly-colored costumes, the 25th of May is remarkable simply for its size and history.

Bolivia Folklore
Sucre Folklore

Sacrifice Bolivia
Sacrifice Sucre
Chicha Mike
Bolivian Photo Bomb
Cute Girl Bolivia
Bolivia
Girl Bolivia
Bolivian Shoes
Kids Bolivia
School Girls Bolivia
Evo Morales
Not liking Morales
Demonstration Sucre
Crosses Sucre
Pin Girls
Lamperas Bolivia
Military Sucre Bolivia
The 25th of May On May 25th, 1809, students and nationalists in Sucre declared independence from the Spanish Empire. Known as the "Grito de la Libertad", or Shout of Liberty, this was the first of many popular uprisings all across South America. Today, Sucre is rightfully proud to be the birthplace of South American independence.
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